11 results for "jazz"
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    Jazz Animation 2016 Project by Ashley Stroud Aug 23, 2016 Products Photoshop After Effects 7.3k 7

    Students animated the melody of a jazz song using imagery inspired by Paul Klee from hand drawn and painted surfaces, making shapes in Photoshop and animating in After Effects. The final animation was given to our school's jazz band, under the direction of Patrick Bowen, without any audio and then interpreted by the students into a new song. The piece was projected during one of their performances and they played their composition live.

    Jazz Widney Member Member Joined Jan 31, 2016 Products Adobe Premiere Pro Photoshop After Effects

    Jazz Lund Member Member Joined Feb 18, 2016 Products Dreamweaver Adobe Captivate

    Where I'm From (media edition) - audio recording Project by Chris Clark Mar 14, 2017 Products Audition 103 0

    Follow a template to draft a poem about the influence media have had on you. Jazz up your draft and record it on a smartphone. A time-tested introductory exercise for a unit on sound recording and editing. The poem "Where I'm from" by George Ella Lyon has become a model for many creative exercises.

    Understanding Multimedia, Humanity [Peers] and Oneself Lesson Plan by tom chambers Aug 2, 2011 Products Adobe Premiere Elements 1.6k 2

    Using Your Senses “Human beings are sensory creatures – that is, we operate not just through what we know but through what we see and hear and feel. Reading about something brings us understanding, but our senses of sight, hearing and touch deepen that understanding. Multimedia – combinations of words, sounds, images, video and animation – can provide that sensory input. Multimedia productions can take many forms, including an encyclopedia CD-ROM, a television commercial, a full-length movie, a short video on the Internet or an animated introduction to a Web site.” [Technology Applications, Grade 7/8, Pearson Education, Inc., New Jersey (ISBN 0-13-036333-2)] Project 1 Incorporation and visualization/interpretation of “Teen Poems” [100-poems.com] to comprise slide shows created with the authoring tool, Adobe Premiere Elements. Students are assigned poems to read, comprehend and visualize/interpret as 15-slide, WMV movie presentations. The text is incorporated throughout the visualizations. This exercise places the students “in the shoes” of their peers to begin to understand their [peers’] feelings about life and look for similarities/differences. As the students hone their skills with the authoring software, they also explore the psychology of their age group and develop a deeper understanding of compassion for others. And the reading/comprehending and visualizing/interpreting of the poems enhance cognitive/creative skills for better performance in core-subject areas. Project 2 Incorporation and visualization/interpretation of self-generated poems to comprise slide shows created with the authoring tool, Adobe Premiere Elements. Students are asked to conceptualize/write their own poems to visualize/interpret as 15-slide, movie presentations. The text is incorporated throughout the visualizations. This exercise places the students in the situation to begin to understand their own feelings about life and compare themselves to their peers. As the students hone their skills with the authoring software, they also explore their own psychology and develop a deeper understanding of themselves. And the conceptualizing/writing and visualizing/interpreting of the poems enhance cognitive/creative skills for better performance in core-subject areas. Project 3 “ME” Visualization/interpretation of self [self-portrait] to comprise a five-minute movie that approximates self-exploration movies for the Arts at the college/university levels to open/enhance creative thinking and create a greater awareness of self. The students are asked to venture … one at a time … outside the classroom and within the campus environs to utilize the “Jazz DV 151” Internet movie [320X240 pixels] camcorders to generate [with narration (auditory)] several movie clips [20 to 30 seconds each] in keeping with self exploration. The clips are then uploaded to the student computers to be used with the authoring tool, Adobe Premiere Elements. As the students hone their skills with the authoring software, they also explore their own psychology and develop a deeper understanding of themselves. And the narrating [auditory] and visualizing/interpreting via the movie clips enhance cognitive/creative skills for better performance in core-subject areas.

    Evaluating Yourself (And Your Voice) as a Singer Web Link by Rosa Webb Mar 23, 2016 Products Audition 726 0

    Everybody loves a good singer. However, did you know that not all of the best singers were born with a perfect singing voice? Many singers started singing in a different range that ultimately progressed into something better, if not perfect. If you are contemplating on taking up singing as a hobby, or if you want to learn how to sing professionally, here are a few basic tips on how to gauge your singing voice and strengthen your singing ability. How do you know if you have the potential to become a good singer? In order to figure out if you are a good singer or not, you need to listen very closely to yourself while you are singing. Another thing is to find out what you actually sound like, and what you would want to sound like. The reason being that sometimes, your concept of a good sound might get in the way of the feeling that you are a good singer. For example: If your voice sounds more like an operatic singer and your concept of good singing is sounding like Adele, then you would feel like a bad singer because you cannot compare yourself to her. If your concept of singing is limited to one sound only, and you do not sound that way, you would feel that singing would be a waste of time. You would think you are a mediocre singer when in actuality, you have talent and skill, and you sound different from everybody else. You can also take a course like this one to get different exercises that will improve your voice. How do you evaluate your voice? Record yourself – Use Adobe Audition and a compatible computer microphone to record yourself and play it back. If you don't have Adobe Audition software, set up your phone, or any recording device and record yourself. You should be singing in different vocal ranges and styles. After recording, find a quiet place and take some time to listen to yourself. You might not like hearing your voice captured in a recording. Ask yourself what was good about your performance, and what you want to improve on. Here are some additional tips on how to record yourself singing for evaluation. Find a mentor or critique – This person should be able to give you honest and unbiased feedback on how you sound like. They should also be able to give you constructive criticism and tell you what you need to improve on. Do not be afraid to evaluate yourself on how you sound like, or how your voice feels when you are singing. If it feels good, it probably sounds good. If it feels like it hurts, then it might be hurting your ears. If you can't find a suitable vocal coach in your hometown you could always try out some online singing lessons (see a list of good ones here). They can be very helpful. Listen to a variety of music - Listen to opera, jazz, classical, folk music, country, rap, R and B. Try out all these different genres and figure out where you are most comfortable. Keep in mind that a good opera voice is significantly different from a good rock voice or a good country music voice. If you are not gifted with a wonderful singing voice, then you can tailor-fit your style of singing to your selected genre, and just go with the flow. When your concept of singing changes, and you find out where your voice fits, you are on your way to becoming a great singer. It's also great for your brain.