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Brian O'Dell
Digital Media Instructor

Halloween Scavenger Hunt Project

Lesson Plan Published 8/17/15 Last updated on 5/16/18

This project is used in my video production class but can also be implemented into Graphic Design as a collage idea, Photography, Internet Search, Power Point or Publisher design project . Students take the list and must complete the shot of each and then design a finished production to submit on Halloween Night.

Products
  • Acrobat

    The complete PDF solution for working anywhere. (includes desktop, web, and mobile access)

  • Audition

    Audio recording, mixing, and restoration.

  • Adobe Premiere Pro

    Edit media in its native format and create productions for film, TV, and web.

  • Photoshop

    Editing and compositing for photos, web and mobile app designs, 3D artwork, videos, and more.

  • Flash Player

    Build responsive games and video content across browsers and OS versions.

  • Fireworks

  • After Effects

    Create motion graphics and visual effects for film, TV, video, and web.

  • Bridge

    Centralized desktop access for all your files and assets.

  • Illustrator

    Create beautiful vector art and illustrations.

Duration
1+ Week
ISTE NETS-S
Communication and Collaboration, Research and Information Fluency, Digital Citizenship, Creativity and Innovation, Technology Operations and Concepts, Critical Thinking Problem Solving and Decision Making
Materials

Photography Camera for Photography Assignment and Graphic Design Assignment

Video or DSLR camera for video recording

Shot sheet template and storyboards for concept chosen

Adobe Master Collection

Lighting equipment if you have it (not necessary)

Audio equipment for recording voice or cameras with accessible recording

Tripods

Computers and Internet Access


CC License
None
Ratings
5 / 5 • 6 Ratings

Resources (4)

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Comments (22)

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Alberto Arriendo Medellin

Posted on 11/9/17 8:47:32 PM Permalink

Thanks for sharing Brian I will get many ideas for my projects!

Eric McCrobie

Posted on 10/23/17 12:31:16 PM Permalink

​Brian,

Did you ever share one of the final projects that was completed by your class?

Beth OMalley

Posted on 10/14/15 4:26:40 AM Permalink

This is fabulous resource. Thanks so much for sharing Brian. I have shared it with my network on Facebook and I will definitely be trying this with my media classes.

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/14/15 11:23:21 AM Permalink

It a great challenge for the students because of the theme and time constraints. But it also gives them an idea how important organizing and setting times to film are. They actually love it. Hope your network loves it too. I will post a finished project when done. My first year students are doing a power point animation and written story concept for this project. Will post a student project when completed for this too.

Eric McCrobie

Posted on 10/28/15 1:39:55 PM Permalink

Please Do... even if you had the start of one, or a rough edit done that would be awesome.

laurie doran

Posted on 10/11/15 1:42:55 PM Permalink

Brian, Thanks for sharing. This really gets me thinking...teaching in an urban setting I would have to revamp the list a bit. I teach in a 1:1 iPad school, so students would be able easily capture and could build this in iMovie or adobe premiere clip right on the iPad. It could be a good intro to composition, lighting, shot angle, editing....and fun.

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/11/15 3:31:26 PM Permalink

Hi Laurie, absolutely you can adapt however you want. You can do this as a basic project where yo give them shots to look for just to get their creative juices going as well as practicing the areas of production. I used to use iMovie back in the day.

sue bell

Posted on 10/10/15 1:51:05 AM Permalink

Rich Cravatta

Posted on 10/7/15 11:24:19 AM Permalink

Brian,

How do your students get all these shots if you only have 3 cameras? Do you have other assignments going while students wait their turn for the camera? Most of these shots seem to be outside of school work. I have never found a good way to keep students busy while rotating through the cameras. Any ideas would be helpful, thank you

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/7/15 10:09:53 PM Permalink

Hey Rich, Good Question. I always introduce multiple projects that students can work on. I don't believe in "I don't have anything to work on" responses. With what we are capable of doing in our classes I always have them writing, graphic designing, working on animations or filming. What I do is give projected due dates when assignments are due so they always have something to do. This also gives them a chance to step away from an assignment they may be struggling with and concentrate on something else for a day or two. If they are concentrating on one assignment then I give them a date that that assignment is due. It works for my students and I so I will keep it going until changes need to be made. This also allows students to work on communication and time scheduling as they talk to each other about what days they plan on taking out equipment. This is how I implement critical thinking and problem solving, communication and collaboration among students.

Judy Durkin

Posted on 10/7/15 1:59:03 AM Permalink

Thank you for the terrific idea! With a few modifications for the Taiwanese culture, it should work for my classes. Great lesson

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/6/15 7:58:56 PM Permalink

OK, a new pdf file minus the accidental swear word has been uploaded. My apologies!

JoAnna Henry

Posted on 10/6/15 7:04:22 PM Permalink

Brian, You're stuff is amazing! Thanks for sharing! I rarely post, but these are tremendous, so I needed to let you know. Keep up the good work! Your students are better for it.

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/6/15 7:38:21 PM Permalink

Thank you very much for your reaction. Sometimes its nice to hear it for all the work, effort and creativity we put in to make these projects enjoyable for students. This is always a favorite project for students.

Ileane Flores

Posted on 10/6/15 5:22:37 PM Permalink

Adapted this to use for Digital Design. Added a second part that includes the students writing a story about the graphic that they would tell around a campfire.

JoAnna Henry

Posted on 10/6/15 7:05:52 PM Permalink

Great idea! We're always looking for ways to integrate writing. My students will eat this up!

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/8/15 6:05:45 PM Permalink

To fulfill our English Language Arts requirements, my students are writing a Pitch, Introduction, Body and Conclusion relating to a story they want to tell centered around the theme of Halloween. That writing becomes their script which I then break down into video script format incorporating the shots from the list into the ideas they have written. This gives then their shot list concepts, how to write a short film script an prepares them for the filming in order to complete the project.

My lower level class is doing the same thing but creating an animated power point with images, video clips, sound and animation techniques. Will post one when they are done.

Rich Cravatta

Posted on 10/6/15 5:10:30 PM Permalink

Are each of your students assigned a camera for the duration of your class that they can take home? What cameras are you using, are they a cheaper model? The reason I ask is budget reasons, maybe I should purchase a set of loaner cameras. Is there such a thing on a teaching budget? The cameras I currently use cannot be sent home with students.

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/6/15 7:36:32 PM Permalink

We actually have three Nikon D3300 DSLR Cameras that we record with. Students do not get their own cameras. I used to teach with Canon XHA1S HD Video Cameras but when I moved positions the old Career Center took all my equipment. We have a very small budget too but these Nikons do great work and are only 400.00 bucks or so. I use them for video and for Photography so they school was excited about that. Maybe ask for a few more next year but I don't like to overstep my bounds.

Russell Grycza

Posted on 10/6/15 5:07:41 PM Permalink

Scavanger Hunt Project (1.94 MB) is incorrectly tagged as a .htm file, but it's actually a .doc. If you download it to your computer you can easily change the extension.

Also - before you print it out for your students, check over the list of shots - the 18 item should be "A pond SHOT". That pesky "i" key....

Brian O'Dell

Posted on 10/6/15 7:33:37 PM Permalink

I actually noticed that before I posted to my students. I don't usually allow that to happen. Thanks for reminding me but I did change it on my class project.

Annie Kelly

Posted on 8/20/15 8:41:42 AM Permalink

A really creative way to engage students with Adobe products

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