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My Flipped Classroom Experiment

Posted on 1/3/15 by Mark Janke Last updated on 6/7/17

Description

My Flipped Classroom Experiment

As part of the 2014 Adobe Generation Professional: Video course, I was asked to share a resource I made using Premiere about my flipped classroom. This little video doesn't focus on Adobe products but utilizes them as I do a lesson for my students.

As an added bonus, it is a flipped report on flipped learning from early in 2014. I've now done this for 2 years and the results haven't wavered. Only one student has failed and that's because the student left all tests blank, turned in no homework, and was often truant.
Class statistics:

a. Students ages 15-19

b. Videos were each about 3-5 min (one concept each). A whole lesson is about 10-15 min of instruction. I made no changes to what I would traditionally share live in class.

c. Were there any students who did not bother to watch? A few at first. However, in our Moodle classes, I made quizzes to complete after watching (short 2-3 min) and I occasionally do examples from their homework. This is the same issue I would have in a traditional classroom. Did the student take their textbook home and study? Sometimes yes and sometimes no.

d. Are these exceptional students? This is a typical classroom: Motivated, Average, and "Why do I have to Be here?". The only way a student fails, so far, is simply by not doing any homework and leaving tests and quizzes blank. This has only happened once and it was a student who was trying to get parent's attention.

I have since continued using flipped video (created using Premiere and Camtasia) to create lessons. The statistics that I present in this short report, still hold true for my science and math classes.

Enjoy!

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My Flipped Classroom Experiment

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ISTE NETS·S Standards
Communication and Collaboration
  • 5/5 | 15 Ratings
All Comments (24)

Helena Showell

Posted on 11/9/15 - Permalink

Great video! Full of very helpful and useful information! :-)

Karen Golle

Posted on 11/9/15 - Permalink

Thank you for the inspiration. I'm fascinated by the concept and will realize it myself step by step.

The theory of my course "presentation skills" isn't complicated in most cases, to realize is tricky sometimes.

Karen McFarlane

Posted on 6/20/15 - Permalink

Excellent, I have just started doing this and its great. I also have improved data from my students.

Deborah Lloyd

Posted on 2/5/15 - Permalink

I am very interested in the flipped classroom concept and learning about your experience was very informative - thanks

Mark Janke

Posted on 2/5/15 - Permalink

Deborah,

I'm glad you found this informative. I am gaining some experience at this. If you haven't done it before, I'm willing to offer ideas from my experience.

David Lloyd

Posted on 2/4/15 - Permalink

Mark, great explanation and glad it is working for you. For the last 4 years I have provided all my theory lectures in video format and MP3 files to my thrid year University Science class and use podcasts to deal with issues that are not constant. My classes then become interactive tutorials allowing students to contextualise the information provided. I am now obsevring a greater understanding of the topic and issue taught than with traditional startegies. This also has the benifit of providing a better opportunity for students to review topics and themes they find difficult. Keep up the good work

David

Mark Janke

Posted on 2/5/15 - Permalink

David,

Your class sounds great. I always like hearing how people are implementing digital tools to improve learning. I also like that you've found the same results as me with the student's ability to review. I think that may be the most valuable part of this style of learning.

Thanks for looking at this resource.

Meg Fish

Posted on 2/5/15 - Permalink

Great examples of a favorite quote by Benjamin Franklin — ' Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.' Involving them in face to face interaction enables them to get to the stage of learning. I think we are starting to utilize technology in learning for the appropriate content. Love to hear your successes!

John McKenna

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

Could the improvement be due to changing content? When I think back to my math classes it seemed that the class, as a whole, was able to digest some content with ease while other concepts thew everybody for a loop. Just wondering... :)

  • Same kids
  • Same sample time
  • Same material?

Mark Janke

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

John,

That's a great question. I did this video last year for the rest of the year and this year is entirely flipped.

Certainly, there are lessons that they grasp faster than others but almost all of the material that they learn in the early chapters (when I made this video) is used the entire year and build upon. Before making this video, I had done flipped lessons before but not in the foundational chapters. Yes, my sample times are the same in this video.
This year, with a new group of students, I've split my class into two groups. One did traditional instruction, the other flipped. Both groups improved by 4-7% overall on the flipped method when learning closely related material.

When I monitor their online activity and where the class is spending their time it is largely reviewing instructed concepts. When I ask them what they believe the most important part of that style of learning is they agree with the data -reviewability.

I appreciate your questions on the methology in creating a good test and sample for statistical analysis. Too many do not evaluate data or conduct tests in a way to produce quality information.

Thanks for checking my lesson out.

John McKenna

Posted on 2/5/15 - Permalink

Thanks for your feedback, I appreciate it very much. I am looking forward to implementing a "flipped" period into my rotation.

"Where is it written that education has to be boring? Give them what they want. As long as the path takes them to the same destination..."

Carolyn De Anda

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

Mark, Thanks very much for the 1-6-15 comments. Really Helpful!

Mark Janke

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

I'm glad you found it helpful. Thanks for checking this little report out.

L B

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

I would truly like to try this out but I would need to do a lot more to begin. What I mean is I work in a rural community with little to no internet access therefore that would have to be dealt with initially. Any suggestions will be appreciated. By the way I am from the Caribbean Trinidad to be exact.

Mark Janke

Posted on 2/3/15 - Permalink

LB,

I have a number of students without internet access. I've managed to get some internet connections with grants or by talking to internet service providers. However, I have a few in rural areas that don't have access because companies haven't propogated their service that far. For those students, I either:

1. Copy all of the lessons to their computer or device

2. Give them a set of DVDs to use at home.

3. I also set up two computers with all of my materials at school for our ofter school program. Students are welcome to study there before they go home for the day.

It isn't as ideal but it still works. I have kept close data on that group to track their average performance vs. the rest of the class with a web-based service. There is less than a 2% difference overall (which easily fits into an acceptable margin of error).

I hope that helps get some ideas going for you.

L B

Posted on 2/4/15 - Permalink

Much Thanks I appreciate the suggestions although it may take longer to implement I think it would still work. Thanks.

Matthew Miller

Posted on 1/22/15 - Permalink

Mark, I'm about to present a workshop on flipped learning here at Cairo American College and will be using your video as one of the resources. I'd love to chat about your workshop if you have a chance - I totally agree that too many of this type focus on the tool or the newest terminology rather than the practical aspects.

Thanks for posting this!

Mark Janke

Posted on 1/23/15 - Permalink

M Panasuk

Posted on 1/8/15 - Permalink

Great work! I like the idea of the flipped classroom and I use it to some extent - I agree with what you said about providing the environment for students to learn - key. Thanks!

Mark Janke

Posted on 1/10/15 - Permalink

M,

I'm glad you liked the video. This is one part of a workshop series I'm putting together on the flipped room. When I present at workshops or teacher's conventions, I always emphasize the importance of student learning because I think a lot of the material on the Flipped classroom is distracted by cool technologies or saving teacher's planning time.

Thanks for your feedback.

Yolanda Hall

Posted on 1/7/15 - Permalink

I loved this. This is a great explanation for what is needed not only for the students, but for the teachers to help them learn the technology to implement such blended learning. Teaching the students how to utilize a 24/7 self-help portal is great. This is why I am taking this course, so that I can learn how to fine tune the video that I have collected to post within my Google School. I have used Moodle for years but the school did not keep up the software. I now want to do as you prescribed by flipping my course with posted video, Java and Acrobat interactive tutorials.

Mark Janke

Posted on 1/10/15 - Permalink

Yolanda,

I'm glad you find this helpful. Best wishes as you flip your classes. It is a lot of work, at first, but really pays out in the long run.

Christel Wilkie

Posted on 1/6/15 - Permalink

Thanks Mark. That was really helpful. What age were the students in your trial? How long were the online sessions students were required to watch? Were there any students who did not bother to watch the sessions? What I am getting at, I suppose, is asking whether the group was a very motivated one to begin with. I would love to try this myself with some of my classes. Well done!

Mark Janke

Posted on 1/6/15 - Permalink

Christel,

Excellent Questions. I'll have to add this to my description. Thanks for bringing this to my attention. Here are the answers:

What age were the students? Ages 15-19 (Some had failed the class many times or transfered from other schools without the credits)

How Long were the onlines sessions? About 10-15 min. The same as if I were to teach it in class. I left nothing out.

Were there any students who did not bother to watch? A few at first. However, in our Moodle classes, I made quizzes to complete after watching (short 2-3 min) and I occasionally do examples from their homework. This is the same issue I would have in a traditional classroom. Did the student take their textbook home and study? Sometimes yes and sometimes no. However, I've done this for 2 years now and the results haven't changed. Student engagement with material is higher than if I taught it traditionally. Also, their opportunities to review are indefinite because they can always replay lessons.

This is a typical classroom: Motivated, Average, and "Why do I have to Be here?" The only way a student fails, so far, is simply by not doing any homework and leaving tests and quizzes blank. This has only happened once and it was a student who was trying to get parent's attention.

I highly recommend this model for STEM classes (especially). I'm creating my entire workshop that I've given in the US and Canada when districts invite me in to share. I'll have it on my channel (the same one this video is from).

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