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Tavi Barnes
Graphic designer

Adobe Education vrs Literacy

Good morning Adobe Family,

I am having doozie of a time trying to develop a PD plan. I have a group of students that I would love to use InDesign as a catalysis to help promote literacy in the classroom. I have a group of students that are below reading level and I would like to improve their reading. My plan is to use  InDesign as a way to as a way to enrich further reading literacy opportunities. Im actually stuck at this point.

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Deston Tanner

Posted on 12/19/14 10:27:04 AM Permalink

thanks

Deila Caballero

Posted on 3/21/14 8:09:05 PM Permalink

I would also consider a newsletter project. The newsletter can be a way to get them to write about or compile current events, book reviews, interviews etc. If they are coming up with original materials you can apply any theme to this project, perhaps creating a newsletter with articles imagined to have been relevant to the world of a piece of literature you are reading in class or a time period studied in a Social Sciences course etc. There is a Newsletter project in the Visual Design Curriculum, project 7. I have attached a link to the curriculum and the instructors guide below.

Love to hear about your experience in InDesign when the lesson concludes!

-Deila

Visual Design Curriculum

Project 7 Instructors Guide

Lukas Engqvist

Posted on 3/13/14 6:03:49 AM Permalink

Sorry I didn't see this before. Using gutenberg.org as source material for students to make their own classic version of a book is great. Actually I find it a big challenge today to teach InDesign because students have a hard time to tell what is a paragraph and what is not.

I hope this resource can help you: http://edex.adobe.com/resource/11801f22/

I made the instructions available so that you can edit if you want. My suggestion is first let them do the children's book step ny step. Let them figure out where best to break the pages so that the text and images play together. When they have done the simple book have them choose a more complex book. Explain what typographic widows and orphans are and then tell them they they need to proof the book and edit to avoid widows and orphans. If they have other art skills you can ask them to illustrate the book with images or photographs (as you see fit).

I would also look in to using Acrobat Pro or Adobe Reader with commenting tools to mark or comment PDF texts. It is possible to review a document as a group so all students commentaries of the text can be compiled and overlaid in context. eg (http://blogs.adobe.com/acrobatforlifesciences/2011/10/using-acrobat-shared-for-approval-workflows/)

Donna Dolan

Posted on 3/7/14 12:27:38 PM Permalink

How about have a student create a book (or Magazine) of characters, based on a completed reading assignment. They could create a cover for this book (magazine) and then use the master pages to set up the document. Each page could be a bio on the character and a facing page could be favorite quotes or scenes from the text.

I have a resource in the exchange you ma want to take a look at. titled: Assessing Understanding Creatively Using Adobe InDesign

Good luck, I know your students will enjoy using InDesign.

Maria Nadal

Posted on 2/23/14 4:16:33 PM Permalink

How's this: After reading a piece of dramatic literature, they can write fictional news articles reporting on the events. Some serious, some fantastical, satire welcome. Then articles are used to build an entire fictional newspaper in inDesign.

tavi barnes

Posted on 3/6/14 11:59:22 PM Permalink

I love your idea. That you so much. I will come up with a lesson plan using this idea.