Guiding Questions for Assessing Creativity

Posted on May 23, 2013 by Adobe Education Latest activity: Sep 30, 2014

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Guiding questions help students think about their own learning and promote positive and constructive feedback, strongly influencing students' opinions of their own creativity (Beghetto, 2006). For example: What path did you take to come up with this idea? What alternatives did you consider earlier on?


What are some of the guiding questions you use with students?


This discussion post is part of the Adobe Education Exchange Professional Development Workshop, Creativity in Today’s Classrooms: Assessing Creativity in Today’s Classrooms.


Comments (58)

Mats Soderberg

Posted on Sep 30, 2014 1:38 PM - Permalink

Favourite questions

I also really like the aha moment when students are working on a project, it´s get them inspired and continuing working on


marie orlin

Posted on Sep 27, 2014 11:37 PM - Permalink

I like to have my students explore possibilities. I ask them to jump into "What if . . ." or "How about . . ." I also model this when introducing new concepts or techniques. So I think my question would be something like "Describe how you used 'what if' to develop your project and why you made the choices you did?"

Michelle Kramer

Posted on Sep 17, 2014 5:00 PM - Permalink

Many others have already described many of my guiding questions; however, one that I did not (yet) see is:

Objectively looking at your work, and completely ignoring the path that brought you to this result, what does the work tell its viewer? Allow the work to stand on its own, separate from the actions that brought it to exist and judge its meaning and ability to communicate with others.

Jason Webb

Posted on Sep 16, 2014 7:30 PM - Permalink

My favorites to ask are:

1. What was your "aha" moment while working on this project?

2. What was a resource you used in this process that you never though you would have used when you started?

Yone Santos

Posted on Aug 28, 2014 6:21 PM - Permalink

Thank you all for such great ideas. My favourite questions are:

Why have you chosen this …?

What path did you take to come up with this idea?

How does it differ from other …?

How do you feel about your final product?

If you were going through any of the stages again, what would you do differently?

tannizia anthony

Posted on Aug 28, 2014 3:56 PM - Permalink

I teach math and art to grade ten students. Some of my guiding questions are:

1. Why did you choose this process?

2. What challenges you face in completing this project?

3. How did you overcome these challenges?

4. What did you learn from doing this project?


Barbara Swanner

Posted on Aug 27, 2014 6:28 PM - Permalink

A few guiding questions I use with my students when looking at an artist's work are: 1. How could you make this your own? 2. What would you change? 3. What is this piece saying, could you say it better? How?

When looking at their own work, I might ask: 1. How do you feel about this? Does it do what you were hoping it would say? 3. Did you share this with your friends, what did they say about it? Did they seem to understand what you wanted the piece to say? Did they suggest anything to you that you might try next time?

When finishing up a group critique. I have the class close their eyes, think of the work we just looked at, then one by one, keeping their eyes closed they have to answer the following questions: 1. What piece do you see (describe it) and what about this piece speaks to you. I tell them them the things that have the greatest impression on us are those things we remember long after our contact with them. You might not remember anything about yesterday, but the things you do remember are things that made an impression on you, and that is the kind of art we want make and the photos we want take, we want to make a lasting impression on the viewer. The students really get this and it makes them push their work, they all want to be the person that makes the piece that is remembered.

Lynn Sullivan

Posted on Aug 23, 2014 3:47 PM - Permalink

How did ____ inspire you in your piece?

What elements were important to you? Were there any elements you wanted to include in your piece that you ended up not using?

Did you get feedback from peers or family?

sandro c mendes

Posted on Aug 18, 2014 9:43 PM - Permalink

Very well! ;)

Katherine Yamashita

Posted on Aug 18, 2014 7:05 PM - Permalink

Hi,

In my classes lessons I call them look fors, and some of them are skills specific, but many are problem solving or processed based. Have I shared my concept and planned process with a classmate or friend to see if they have any suggestions? Do I have evidence of "in process" assessment and revision? Have I included my brain storming notes or rough drafts? Did your final work change from your initial intentions? How did it change? How do you feel about this? What is the coolest thing you learned during this assignment? What have you learned during this assignment? What might you want to do next?

Ryan Patton

Posted on Aug 13, 2014 5:42 PM - Permalink

I used to teach video game programming. The questions to the kids were very simple:

1) How does it work? They would have to go through the code to explain the algorithm and functions. This demonstrates that they made the game and did not find code and copy it.

2) What inspired this product?

3) What were the shortcomings of the project?

4) Compared to similar products, what makes your game better?

5) Compared to similar products, what makes your game not as good?

6) What did you learn from doing this project?

Jason Horadam

Posted on Aug 10, 2014 6:43 AM - Permalink

I work with primary students. Some questions I use in my movie making unit are:

  • What is the central dramatic question in your plot?
  • Which movies are you using as inspiration for your project?
  • Why did you choose to use this camera angle at this point?
  • Why was this style of music used in the background?
  • How do you think that the audience will react to your film at this point?

Jody Campbell

Posted on Aug 3, 2014 2:01 PM - Permalink

Great question! I will have to add this workshop!

Bhuvana Sriram

Posted on Aug 3, 2014 8:47 AM - Permalink

I like the concept of asking questions to make the students to think about the project they are making. I may include the following questions as my guiding questions.

* Why did you choose this theme?

* Why did you choose this format?

* What challenges did you face in the making of this project?

* How did you overcome it?

* What is your interpretation at the end of this project?

Janette Wotherspoon

Posted on Jul 30, 2014 12:35 AM - Permalink

I like the concept of questioning the student on how they implemented their creativity. I would probably ask

What steps did you take to add your individual creativity to this project

What is your individual interpretation of the final outcome

How do you think creativity was used to improve the outcome of this project

What have you learnt about your own creativity in the process of project

Did the development of this project inspire you to learn more about your own creativity

Derek Cooper

Posted on Jul 28, 2014 6:36 PM - Permalink

I think this is a great start. This is what sparks ideas.

Some of the questions I have asked include:

What do you see when you look at this creation?

What is your interpretation of the work?

What made you feel like creating this work?

What did you feel like when you started this work? When you ended it?

Jody Chapel

Posted on Jul 20, 2014 2:54 PM - Permalink

This is great to be able to see so many of the questions that you ask your students. I often wonder what other teachers ask their students--and here it is! Thanks!

The following is typical of the questions I ask my students to guide them in writing their reflection statements. I alter them to be relevant for whatever they are working on. This set of questions was for their end of class reflection, but the questions for projects are similar.

As you look at the work in your Portfolio what stands out as being your best work and why?
In what areas could you improve and how?
What was your favorite project and why?
What has been the most challenging or frustrating part of what you have learned to do in this class and how did you overcome it?
What did you learn that was most surprising or eye opening?
What do you think it takes to be successful in this class and how could those same work behaviors could be useful in a professional design job or career?

I use similar questions in all my digital media classes (photography, design, multimedia)

Benjamin Quansah

Posted on Jul 16, 2014 3:15 AM - Permalink

My Guiding Questions to my students in a multimedia production project

Why did you choose to be the camera man on the project?

How could you incorporate scene narrations into this project?

What path did you take to come up with this idea?

Did you consider any alternatives ?


Valery Keibler

Posted on Jul 14, 2014 3:54 PM - Permalink

As a part of a wrap-up:

-What do you now notice that you did not before this course?

- What new ideas have you gained from this course or assignment?

Frank Vandenburg

Posted on Jul 13, 2014 4:39 AM - Permalink

In the self-assessment that typically forms part of my assessment process, I often ask questions like:

  • What was the greatest challenge for you in developing this project?
  • What if any of your ideas about the topic changed as a result of preparing this project?
  • How would you summarize this project to someone with no background in the subject?

I find that the answers help learners to self-assess and greatly assist me as well.

Donna Reedy

Posted on Jul 8, 2014 11:07 PM - Permalink

  • What obstacle(s) did you have to overcome after starting this project?
  • What did you have to adjust or change to make this project successful?
  • What changes would you make if you could do this project again?

Tyler Brandt

Posted on Jul 7, 2014 8:17 PM - Permalink

How can you apply the principles that you have read about to your own work?

Is there another way you could have come to this conclusion?

Tony Carland

Posted on Jul 5, 2014 12:59 PM - Permalink

1. I ask the trainees to explain a story or theme they see in their work
and
2. Withing the group, can they understand the response from others to their story

Chris Lorenz

Posted on Jun 30, 2014 3:07 AM - Permalink

One of the things I always ask my students is, have you talked to anyone else about your idea? If the answer is yes, I then ask what was there response.

If they answer no, I then ask why not and again encourage them to present their ideas to another person.

William Brenner

Posted on Jun 29, 2014 7:44 PM - Permalink

Once you define the end goal, what it is that you want to achieve or create, list several new methods for achieving it that you may not have tried before.

Can you describe the advantages and disadvantages of each method?

What does this new method do to define a new way of thinking about the goal?

Teresita Galvizo

Posted on Jun 19, 2014 12:52 AM - Permalink

The project is to develop a business plan.

Some of my guiding questions are:

What type of business will you form?

What type of business ownership will you use?

Naomi Cornette

Posted on Jun 12, 2014 12:32 AM - Permalink

How is your idea different from others?

What methods could pull your audience in more?

Cheryl Covey

Posted on Jun 10, 2014 3:05 PM - Permalink

The project is to create a logo for a business they would open.

Some of my guiding questions are:

What kind of business would you open if you were to open your own business.

What kind of logo design would make anyone stop and view your site? How will you make it stand out compared to other business logos?

Jean Harper

Posted on Mar 23, 2014 7:55 PM - Permalink

Some of my guiding questions are: how are the elements of art used in creating a piece? How can artwork represent a society? Does history reflect or form the artists of an era?

Jessica Cone

Posted on Mar 12, 2014 3:18 PM - Permalink

We mostly use Photoshop, Illustrator, and InDesign for my computer graphics class. I use questions like

Why would your client chose your design? What makes it stand out?

Why is your piece successful/unsuccessful?

What would you change?

Jenny Izquierdo

Posted on Mar 3, 2014 5:43 PM - Permalink

We mostly use Photoshop in our Image Manipulation class. Projects are designed based on the tools/techniques covered during lecture time. Students are provided with a rubric/assignment idea and they are to develop it implementing the material they have just learned. Once the assignment is due, they are to present their work and answer some of these questions:

What were some of the issues you run into when implementing this technique?

How did you overcome/solve those issues?

Does the work reflect those solutions?

Lana Powers

Posted on Jun 10, 2014 3:25 PM - Permalink

Although my class was not graphic design, I used the same guiding questions with a commercial project in an Interactive Media course.
In researching for inspiration, what video techniques appealed to you and why?
Which of these did you implement in your project? Why?
Were there any problems or issues with this project and how were they resolved?

Sylvia Hernandez

Posted on Jan 4, 2014 3:01 AM - Permalink

Why do you choose this technique?

Is your work different from other works do you have done?

If you have to do the work another way what you would change and why?

Nathan Mehr

Posted on Nov 14, 2013 5:15 AM - Permalink

As I hope to incorporate more widely the entire Creative Cloud suite in the classroom I believe assessing product use is in order:

Why did you choose InDesign as opposed to Premiere in order to express you ideas?

What advantages have you found to using "X" to visualize and convey meaning?

Questions along these lines, I believe, engage the students with their creative product/project and allows the instructor to know the amount of forethought placed into the creative process on the students part.

Rosemary Ratajczyk

Posted on Nov 5, 2013 2:14 AM - Permalink

How can you make your solution to the problem different from other students?

What is unique about your final product?

What steps did you take to come up with your final interpretation of the problem?

How can you express your idea to engage the viewer?

Is your work different from other students?

*These are questions that I am currently asking students for the design of an ad for a community newspaper.

Dennis Neufeld

Posted on Oct 25, 2013 1:43 PM - Permalink

Where did you find enjoyment while creating?

where did you find difficulty while creating?

Tarek Bahaa El Deen

Posted on Oct 9, 2013 4:37 PM - Permalink

Example for guiding questions:

what are inspire you to do this ---------?

why you are choose the element --------------- to use?

for whom you do do this?

Phyllis Kaupp Seas

Posted on Sep 5, 2013 6:04 PM - Permalink

What made this ________particularly challenging to you?

How would you use this _______________in other areas? Or NOT?

Why did you choose_______________ as your project for this?

Chris Lorenz

Posted on Jun 30, 2014 3:09 AM - Permalink

I love your questions. These are great follow up questions for once the students have completed their project.

Gerri Light

Posted on Sep 2, 2013 11:55 PM - Permalink

I teach technology courses and frequently ask students to think forward 5 or 10 years about what changes might occur in technology. With that in mind I ask them to design some new product, the design must include a rationale for how it relates to the technology change they identified.

Guiding questions include "why is this topic valuable to discuss now"?

Bethany Rayl

Posted on Aug 31, 2013 2:10 PM - Permalink

1. What made you choose the ________ (topic, product, learning artifact, etc.) that you did?

2. What do you think was the most important thing you learned about ________?

3. What surprised you most in your learning?

4. How does this relate to your life?

Chris Lorenz

Posted on Jun 30, 2014 3:11 AM - Permalink

I really like your questions. I especially like your questions because students cannot just give a yes or no answer.

Imelda Hernández

Posted on Aug 5, 2013 1:39 PM - Permalink

I've always wondered:

Can you assess creativity?
What should be the criteria to avoid a subjective assessment in the creative process of our students?
Should we design a rubric to evaluate each creative activity?
Sometimes the simplicity of the creative process is when expressed a great idea.
I hope that at the end of this workshop to design a rubric that allows me to objectively evaluate a creative process.

Jody Chapel

Posted on Jul 20, 2014 3:09 PM - Permalink

Like Ken Robinson said in the video, creativity is a process not an event. Also, that it is important to develop relevant and practical criteria. Those things really stood out to me.

Angela Gomez-Holbrook

Posted on Aug 4, 2013 6:51 PM - Permalink

1. What resources i.e. websites, books, magazines did you use to develop this idea?

2. if you simplify it to black and white, does it still work?

marcia blanco

Posted on Jul 28, 2013 5:05 AM - Permalink

I have my students help me to develop or tweak the rubric and my most effective question is "What does creativity look like to you in the context of this assignment?" I get some pretty helpful feedback as to what they think I am looking for and sometimes, they are more dead-on than I am.

Ashley Stroud

Posted on Aug 2, 2013 4:39 AM - Permalink

Love this! I'm going to use it. Thanks.

Angela Gomez-Holbrook

Posted on Aug 4, 2013 6:55 PM - Permalink

Great idea. Asking for their feedback empowers them and their confidence rises.

Robert Eaton

Posted on Jul 22, 2013 12:18 PM - Permalink

If you were to create this again, would you change anything? Why?

Angela Gomez-Holbrook

Posted on Aug 4, 2013 7:00 PM - Permalink

I appreciate this simple question. I always find I want to change something when I have completed a solution and often feel that small margin of change is the turning point for myself and for my students. It allows them to identify for themselves what they have learned and not to get so caught up in the presently completed solution, but work for other iterations.

Jody Chapel

Posted on Jul 20, 2014 3:13 PM - Permalink

I love this question too. But often (way too often) students say they would not change a thing. I think they are so afraid that if they don't "stand by it" it will reflect on their grade.

Karen Dendas

Posted on Aug 10, 2013 11:02 PM - Permalink

Very inspiring question !! Reviewing may lead to even better ideas.

Belinda Caulfield

Posted on Jul 20, 2013 8:55 AM - Permalink

As my role is working with teachers, some questions I ask teachers are:

How can you use the whiteboard to engage the learners?

What activities could you adapt to get the learners to actively participate in the lesson?

Ashley Stroud

Posted on Jul 19, 2013 10:35 PM - Permalink

How will learning this benefit you in the future?

Rick Dowling

Posted on Jul 15, 2013 9:20 PM - Permalink

1. What was your inspiration for choosing a particular visual technique to convey a given idea?

2. Have you considered alternative methods (such as sound or motion graphics) to share an idea or emotion?

Willie Moore

Posted on Jul 17, 2013 5:49 PM - Permalink

A lot depends on upon the assignment. If it involves sound or motion graphics, the guided questions would be tailored to the specific lesson or project in order to measure creativity. I appreciate your observation.


Willie Moore

Posted on Jul 15, 2013 9:04 PM - Permalink

1. How do we measure creativity?

2. How can the use of font selection show creativity?

3. How can the use of color in a design project demonstrate creativity?

Susan Mango Curtis

Posted on Jul 3, 2013 12:10 AM - Permalink

  1. Are there other ways to tell this particular story visually?
  2. What four things would you remove from the layout? Does it still work?
  3. How can color be applied to organize the message?